Upfront

Jan
2007

Transit Authority

Transitions is racing for the checkered flag, acknowledging auto racing as a prime time player in generating consumer awareness. Millions of viewers recently tuned in to see IndyCar Series champ Sam Hornish Jr. make his NASCAR debut providing a highprofile opportunity for Transitions Optical’s new racing sponsorship. This initiative was also part of some terrific TV prime timing with a commercial airing during the Thanksgiving Day parade. Similar to previous years, this end-of-the-year advertising push was tagged with a timely message for consumers to use their vision benefits before they expire.

“NASCAR racing is a hugely popular sport and we’re thrilled that our first opportunity for visibility was with such an accomplished driver in a pivotal race,” says Grady Lenski, Transitions’ commercial strategy and operations director. “More than 20 percent of our target customers are dedicated fans, making this an exciting ‘vehicle’ to boost our brand awareness. Combined with other prominent events like the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade, we’re confident our message reached millions of potential patients.”

Lenski adds race and parade spectators are excellent candidates for Transitions lenses, spending hours outdoors, often during changing light conditions, can appreciate the convenience of automatic protection from UV and glare.

Hornish (pictured here with David Cole, general manager of the Americas, Transitions) is the winningest driver in Indy Car racing history, winning three IndyCar Series Championships in 2001, 2002 and 2006. During the 2006 season he won four events including the 90th running of the Indy 500. In addition to his full-time commitment to the 2007 IndyCar Series championship, Hornish is competing in selected 2007 Busch Series events. Transitions sponsored Hornish during the NASCAR Busch Series race at Phoenix International Raceway. The Transitions logo was visible on the deck lid of Penske Racing’s Mobil 1 Dodge. NASCAR is the second most popular professional sport in terms of television ratings in America, topped only by pro football.

— James J. Spina


 

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